Identity is having its TCP/IP moment

[This is my keynote from Cloud Identity Summit 2015. Unlike most of my talks, this one did not start with a few phrases and then an outline and then a speech and then a deck. This one dropped out of my noggin in basically one whole piece. I wrote this on a flight back home from London based on a conversation with a friend in the industry. Oh, there is no deck. I delivered this as a speech.]

[Credit where credit is due: Josh Alexander gave me the idea for the username and password as cigarettes and the sin tax. Last year, Nat Sakimura around 2 in the morning in my basement talked about service providers charging for username and passwords to cover externalities, and I completely forgot about the conversation. Furthermore, at the time, I didn’t fully track with his idea. I totally get it now and want to make sure I assign full and prior art credit to Nat – the smartest guy in identity, sent from the future to save us all.]

 

 

Remember when we used to pay for a TCP/IP stack. Remember when we paid for network stacks in general? Hell, we had to buy network cards that would work with the right stack.

But think about it… Paying for a network stack. Paying for TCP/IP. Paying for an implementation of a standard.

How quaint that sounds. How delightfully old school that sounds.

But it was. And we did.

And now? No one pays for a TCP/IP stack. Or at least no one pays for it directly. I suppose you can say that what you spend on an OS includes the cost of the network stack. It’s not a very good argument but I suppose you can make it.

When network stacks became free (or essentially cost free) networking jobs didn’t go away. I would posit that we have more networking engineers now than we’ve ever had before. Their jobs morphed with the times and changes in tech.

It’s mid-2015 and I think we need to admit as that the identity industry now looks a lot like the networking industry did back then. The standards are mature enough. The support for them is broad enough. Moreover, not taking a standards-based approach is antithetical to the goals of the modern enterprise.

Simply put, identity is having its TCP/IP moment.

Continue reading “Identity is having its TCP/IP moment”

FAQ for Building a Presentation

I’ve been collecting questions I get about my thoughts on how to build a presentation.  Here are, in no particular order, some of the top ones and my answers.

Does this work for every kind of presentation?

Hell no! It works well, for me, for keynotes. It works well for building talks that are presentation, performances.

It will not work well for lectures and workshops. It will not work well if what you actually need is documentation. See Tufte on that one.

How long does this take?

Start to finish it takes me between 40 and 80 hours to build a complete 20-minute keynote. I can’t tell if that is too much or too little time.

But in the end, it doesn’t matter. Think about building a presentation like building an animated movie. It takes hours upon hours to build just one frame.

Can I do this?

Hell yes! If you have clarity of what you want to communicate and if you have empathy for your audience, you can do this. Do not let anyone tell you otherwise. Continue reading “FAQ for Building a Presentation”

Showing my work

A few weeks back I posted my 9 step process for building  a presentation. I wanted to share some example of that process in action. What follows are glimpses of my “No person is an island” talk which I delivered at Defrag in November.

Step 1 – Finding the Nucleus

I had two quotes that served as the nucleus for this deck.

hierarchies and our love for them is the strange love child of Confucius and the military industry complex

and

treating people like just nodes just rows in a database is, essentially, sociopathic behavior. it ignores the reality that you, your organization, and the other person, group, or organization are connected

Step 2 – Build and outline

I use OmniOutliner for my outlines.  Here’s a PDF of it: no one is an island outline

Step 3 – Write the speech

You can read the final version here, but if you want to see the original with my notation for pictures, check this out.

Steps 4 & 5 – Skeleton Deck to Version 1 Deck

This was a bit of an unusual presentation for me in that I had material from another presentation I wanted to include. That helped get me to a more polished looking version 1 of the presentation than I usual have. Just a heads up – I usually work Keynote but to be fair to my non-Mac friends, I have posted the deck as a pdf: No person is an island v1

Steps 6 to 9 – Getting to ship the deck

I ended up doing 5 revisions to this deck. Usually I do about 10. Here’s the final version: