Stop Treating Your Customers Like Your Employees

Unlike many of my other talks, this one didn’t start are a speech and didn’t start with a few phrases. This talk started as an analyst briefing deck. It had become clear that many of the identity industry analysts, if they covered customer identity at all, did so with a very narrow view of it. I put the progenitor of this deck together so show how broad customer identity is and, more importantly,  how amazingly large the opportunity ahead of us is.

Speaking  season came upon me and I needed something to talk about. I took out all of the Saleforce-specific bits and turned the briefing deck into the keynote below.

The gist is simple: customer identity presents the opportunity to grow the business and move identity professionals from being in a cost center to being in a revenue generation center. We, identity professionals, can be business enablers, something we have never been before.  But, and this is a big one, customer identity is larger than employee identity and applying enterprise-centric techniques to customer-centric use cases is a major mistake. What follows is my attempt to show big the world of customer identity really is.

Continue reading Stop Treating Your Customers Like Your Employees

FAQ for Building a Presentation

I’ve been collecting questions I get about my thoughts on how to build a presentation.  Here are, in no particular order, some of the top ones and my answers.

Does this work for every kind of presentation?

Hell no! It works well, for me, for keynotes. It works well for building talks that are presentation, performances.

It will not work well for lectures and workshops. It will not work well if what you actually need is documentation. See Tufte on that one.

How long does this take?

Start to finish it takes me between 40 and 80 hours to build a complete 20-minute keynote. I can’t tell if that is too much or too little time.

But in the end, it doesn’t matter. Think about building a presentation like building an animated movie. It takes hours upon hours to build just one frame.

Can I do this?

Hell yes! If you have clarity of what you want to communicate and if you have empathy for your audience, you can do this. Do not let anyone tell you otherwise. Continue reading FAQ for Building a Presentation

Showing my work

A few weeks back I posted my 9 step process for building  a presentation. I wanted to share some example of that process in action. What follows are glimpses of my “No person is an island” talk which I delivered at Defrag in November.

Step 1 – Finding the Nucleus

I had two quotes that served as the nucleus for this deck.

hierarchies and our love for them is the strange love child of Confucius and the military industry complex

and

treating people like just nodes just rows in a database is, essentially, sociopathic behavior. it ignores the reality that you, your organization, and the other person, group, or organization are connected

Step 2 – Build and outline

I use OmniOutliner for my outlines.  Here’s a PDF of it: no one is an island outline

Step 3 – Write the speech

You can read the final version here, but if you want to see the original with my notation for pictures, check this out.

Steps 4 & 5 – Skeleton Deck to Version 1 Deck

This was a bit of an unusual presentation for me in that I had material from another presentation I wanted to include. That helped get me to a more polished looking version 1 of the presentation than I usual have. Just a heads up – I usually work Keynote but to be fair to my non-Mac friends, I have posted the deck as a pdf: No person is an island v1

Steps 6 to 9 – Getting to ship the deck

I ended up doing 5 revisions to this deck. Usually I do about 10. Here’s the final version:

The Identity Philosophers Song

With all due apologies to Monty Python and specifically Eric Idle here’s the identity industry’s version of the Philosophers Song. Many thanks to everyone who helped this effort and huge thanks to Eve Maler for all her work on this. What follows is meant with much love and respect to everyone in the industry (mentioned or not). And with that… maestro please:

Jeremy Grant was a real pissant
Who was very rarely stable
iglazer, iglazer was a boozy beggar
who could think you under the table
Blakley whom could out-consume
Madsen, Bradley, and Dingle
Pat Patterson was a beery swine
Who was just as schloshed as Cahill
There’s nothing Wilton couldn’t teach ya’
Bout the raising of the wrist.
Cameron himself was permanently pissed…

George Fletcher, still, of his own free will,
On half a pint of shandy was particularly ill.
Nishant K could stick it away;
Half a crate of whiskey every day.
Patrick Harding, Patrick Harding was a bugger for white lightning
Nash was fond of his dram,
Really Dick Hardt was a drunken fart
“I drink, therefore I am”
Yes, Cameron himself is particularly missed;
A lovely little thinker but a bugger when he’s pissed!

 

And if none of that made sense to you, here’s the original which also might not make much sense either.