Anyone can kill off a protocol a.k.a XACML isn’t dead

There’s a little bit of a kerfuffle going on in XACML-land. A non-Gartner analyst made the claim that XACML is dead. Such a claim doesn’t go unnoticed; so Gerry, Anil, Danny, and Remon have all responded that no, XACML isn’t dead. It is not pining for the fjords. It isn’t even zombified.

Anyone can declare a protocol dead. Last year it was SAML. This year, apparently, it’s XACML. Now as someone who killed off the entire IAM industry, I think I’m in a position to comment about this.

It’s easy to say X is dead. SAML, SPML, DSML – doesn’t matter – you declare it dead, write your blog post, and call it a day. But what’s hard to do, and what is necessary to do, is, if you kill something off, you have to offer an alternative. In the case of IAM, I believe we are seeing the hazy outline of what it will become reborn as start to emerge: something more nimble, developer-friendly, and more indistinguishable from business services.  In the case of XAMCL, no alternative was provided.

Just a few things to keep in perspective when thinking about XACML. First, separate externalized authorization management (EAM) from XACML. Enterprises have been doing EAM for decades. The pattern of using something like RACF as a decision-as-a-service facility is a well established practice. Although enterprises may not be using XACML, they are doing EAM and that will only continue.

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